⛅ Best site to download pdf The Tempest free ⛏ E-Pub Author William Shakespeare ⛺ ⛅ Best site to download pdf The Tempest free ⛏ E-Pub Author William Shakespeare ⛺ Chapter 1list of partsPROSPERO, the right Duke of MilanMIRANDA, his daughterALONSO, King of NaplesSEBASTIAN, his brotherANTONIO, Prospero s brother, the usurping Duke of MilanFERDINAND, son to the King of NaplesGONZALO, an honest old councillorADRIAN and FRANCISCO, lordsTRINCULO, a jesterSTEPHANO, a drunken butlerMASTER, of a shipBOATSWAINMARINERSCALIBAN, a savage and deformed slaveARIEL, an airy spiritIRIS, CERES, JUNO, spirits commanded by Prosperoplaying roles of NYMPHS, REAPERSThe Scene an uninhabited islandAct 1 Scene 1 running scene 1 A tempestuous noise of thunder and lightning heard Enter a Shipmaster and a BoatswainMASTER Boatswain BOATSWAIN Here, master What cheer MASTER Good speak to th mariners Fall to t yarely, or we run ourselves aground Bestir, bestir Exit Enter MarinersBOATSWAIN Heigh, my hearts Cheerly, cheerly, my hearts Yare, yare Take in the topsail Tend to th master s whistle Blow, till thou burst thy wind, if room enough Enter Alonso, Sebastian, Antonio, Ferdinand, Gonzalo and othersALONSO Good boatswain, have care Where s the master Play the men.BOATSWAIN I pray now, keep below.ANTONIO Where is the master, boatswain BOATSWAIN Do you not hear him You mar our labour Keep your cabins You do assist the storm.GONZALO Nay, good, be patient.BOATSWAIN When the sea is Hence What cares these roarers for the name of king To cabin Silence Trouble us not.GONZALO Good, yet remember whom thou hast aboard.BOATSWAIN None that I love than myself You are a counsellor if you can command these elements to silence, and work the peace of the present, we will not hand a rope use your authority If you cannot, give thanks you have lived so long, and make yourself ready in your cabin for the mischance of the hour, if it so hap Cheerly, good hearts Out of our way, I say Exeunt Boatswain with Mariners, followed by Alonso, Sebastian, Antonio and Ferdinand GONZALO I have great comfort from this fellow methinks he hath no drowning mark upon him his complexion is perfect gallows Stand fast, good Fate, to his hanging make the rope of his destiny our cable, for our own doth little advantage If he be not born to be hanged, our case is miserable Exit Enter BoatswainBOATSWAIN Down with the topmast Yare Lower, lower Bring her to try with main course A cry within A plague upon this howling They are louder than the weather or our office Enter Sebastian, Antonio and GonzaloYet again What do you here Shall we give o er and drown Have you a mind to sink SEBASTIAN A pox o your throat, you bawling, blasphemous, incharitable dog BOATSWAIN Work you then.ANTONIO Hang, cur Hang, you whoreson, insolent noisemaker We are less afraid to be drowned than thou art.GONZALO I ll warrant him for drowning, though the ship were no stronger than a nutshell and as leaky as an unstanched wench.BOATSWAIN Lay her ahold, ahold Set her two courses off to sea again Lay her off Enter Mariners, wetMARINERS All lost To prayers, to prayers All lost BOATSWAIN What, must our mouths be cold GONZALO The king and prince at prayers let s assist them, for our case is as theirs.SEBASTIAN I m out of patience.ANTONIO We are merely cheated of our lives by drunkards This wide chopped rascal would thou mightst lie drowning, the washing of ten tides GONZALO He ll be hanged yet,Though every drop of water swear against itAnd gape at wid st to glut him Exeunt Boatswain and Mariners A confused noise within VOICES OFF STAGE Mercy on us We split, we split Farewell, my wife and children Farewell, brother We split, we split, we split ANTONIO Let s all sink wi th king.SEBASTIAN Let s take leave of him Exeunt Antonio and Sebastian GONZALO Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground long heath, brown furze, anything The wills above be done But I would fain die a dry death ExitAct 1 Scene 2 running scene 2 Enter Prospero and MirandaMIRANDA If by your art, my dearest father, you havePut the wild waters in this roar, allay them.The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch,But that the sea, mounting to th welkin s cheek,Dashes the fire out O, I have sufferedWith those that I saw suffer a brave vessel Who had, no doubt, some noble creature in her Dashed all to pieces O, the cry did knockAgainst my very heart Poor souls, they perished.Had I been any god of power, I wouldHave sunk the sea within the earth, or ereIt should the good ship so have swallowed, andThe fraughting souls within her.PROSPERO Be collected No amazement Tell your piteous heartThere s no harm done.MIRANDA O, woe the day PROSPERO No harm I have done nothing but in care of thee Of thee, my dear one, thee, my daughter whoArt ignorant of what thou art nought knowingOf whence I am, nor that I am betterThan Prospero, master of a full poor cell,And thy no greater father.MIRANDA More to knowDid never meddle with my thoughts.PROSPERO Tis timeI should inform thee further Lend thy handAnd pluck my magic garment from me So Lie there, my art Wipe thou thine eyes, have his magic cloakcomfort.The direful spectacle of the wreck, which touchedThe very virtue of compassion in thee,I have with such provision in mine artSo safely ordered that there is no soul No, not so much perdition as an hairBetid to any creature in the vesselWhich thou heard st cry, which thou saw st sink Sitdown, Miranda sits For thou must now know further.MIRANDA You have oftenBegun to tell me what I am, but stoppedAnd left me to a bootless inquisition,Concluding Stay not yet PROSPERO The hour s now come,The very minute bids thee ope thine ear Obey, and be attentive Canst thou rememberA time before we came unto this cell I do not think thou canst, for then thou wast notOut three years old.MIRANDA Certainly, sir, I can.PROSPERO By what By any other house or person Of any thing the image, tell me, thatHath kept with thy remembrance.MIRANDA Tis far off,And rather like a dream than an assuranceThat my remembrance warrants Had I notFour or five women once that tended me PROSPERO Thou hadst and , Miranda But how is itThat this lives in thy mind What see st thou elseIn the dark backward and abysm of time If thou rememb rest aught ere thou cam st here,How thou cam st here thou mayst.MIRANDA But that I do not.PROSPERO Twelve year since, Miranda, twelve year since,Thy father was the Duke of Milan andA prince of power.MIRANDA Sir, are not you my father PROSPERO Thy mother was a piece of virtue, andShe said thou wast my daughter and thy fatherWas Duke of Milan, and his only heirAnd princess, no worse issued.MIRANDA O the heavens What foul play had we, that we came from thence Or blessd wast we did PROSPERO Both, both, my girl.By foul play as thou say st were we heavedthence,But blessedly holp hither.MIRANDA O, my heart bleedsTo think o th teen that I have turned you to,Which is from my remembrance Please you, further.PROSPERO My brother and thy uncle, called Antonio I pray thee, mark me that a brother shouldBe so perfidious he whom next thyselfOf all the world I loved, and to him putThe manage of my state, as at that timeThrough all the signories it was the first,And Prospero the prime duke, being so reputedIn dignity, and for the liberal artsWithout a parallel those being all my study,The government I cast upon my brotherAnd to my state grew stranger, being transportedAnd rapt in secret studies Thy false uncle Dost thou attend me MIRANDA Sir, most heedfully.PROSPERO Being once perfected how to grant suits,How to deny them, who t advance and whoTo trash for over topping, new createdThe creatures that were mine, I say, or changed em,Or else new formed em having both the keyOf officer and office, set all hearts i th stateTo what tune pleased his ear, that now he wasThe ivy which had hid my princely trunkAnd sucked my verdure out on t Thou attend stnot.MIRANDA O good sir, I do.PROSPERO I pray thee, mark me I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicatedTo closeness and the bettering of my mindWith that, which but by being so retired,O er prized all popular rate, in my false brotherAwaked an evil nature, and my trust,Like a good parent, did beget of himA falsehood in its contrary, as greatAs my trust was, which had indeed no limit,A confidence sans bound He being thus lorded,Not only with what my revenue yielded,But what my power might else exact like oneWho having into truth, by telling of it,Made such a sinner of his memoryTo credit his own lie, he did believeHe was indeed the duke, out o th substitutionAnd executing th outward face of royaltyWith all prerogative hence his ambition growing Dost thou hear MIRANDA Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.PROSPERO To have no screen between this part he played,And him he played it for, he needs will beAbsolute Milan Me poor man my libraryWas dukedom large enough of temporal royaltiesHe thinks me now incapable Confederates So dry he was for sway wi th King of NaplesTo give him annual tribute, do him homage,Subject his coronet to his crown, and bendThe dukedom yet unbowed alas, poor Milan To most ignoble stooping.MIRANDA O the heavens PROSPERO Mark his condition and th event, then tell meIf this might be a brother.MIRANDA I should sinTo think but nobly of my grandmother Good wombs have borne bad sons.PROSPERO Now the condition.This King of Naples, being an enemyTo me inveterate, hearkens my brother s suit,Which was, that he, in lieu o th premisesOf homage, and I know not how much tribute,Should presently extirpate me and mineOut of the dukedom, and confer fair Milan,With all the honours, on my brother whereon,A treacherous army levied, one midnightFated to th purpose, did Antonio openThe gates of Milan, and i th dead of darknessThe ministers for th purpose hurried thenceMe and thy crying self.MIRANDA Alack, for pity I, not rememb ring how I cried out then,Will cry it o er again it is a hintThat wrings mine eyes to t.PROSPERO Hear a little further,And then I ll bring thee to the present businessWhich now s upon s without the which, this storyWere most impertinent.MIRANDA Wherefore did they notThat hour destroy us PROSPERO Well demanded, wench My tale provokes that question Dear, they durst not,So dear the love my people bore me nor setA mark so bloody on the business butWith colours fairer, painted their foul ends.In few, they hurried us aboard a barque,Bore us some leagues to sea, where they preparedA rotten carcass of a butt, not rigged,Nor tackle, sail, nor mast the very ratsInstinctively have quit it There they hoist us,To cry to th sea that roared to us to sighTo th winds, whose pity sighing back again,Did us but loving wrong.MIRANDA Alack, what troubleWas I then to you PROSPERO O, a cherubinThou wast that did preserve me Thou didst smile,Infusd with a fortitude from heaven,When I have decked the sea with drops full salt,Under my burden groaned, which raised in meAn undergoing stomach, to bear upAgainst what should ensue.MIRANDA How came we ashore PROSPERO By providence divine.Some food we had, and some fresh water, thatA noble Neapolitan, Gonzalo,Out of his charity who being then appointedMaster of this design did give us, withRich garments, linens, stuffs and necessaries,Which since have steaded much So, ofhis gentleness,Knowing I loved my books, he furnished meFrom mine own library with volumes thatI prize above my dukedom.MIRANDA Would I mightBut ever see that man.PROSPERO Now I arise Prospero standsSit still, and hear the last of our sea sorrow.Here in this island we arrived, and hereHave I, thy schoolmaster, made thee profitThan other princes can that have timeFor vainer hours, and tutors not so careful.MIRANDA Heavens thank you for t And now, I pray you,sir,For still tis beating in my mind your reasonFor raising this sea storm PROSPERO Know thus far forth By accident most strange, bountiful Fortune Now my dear lady hath mine enemiesBrought to this shore and by my prescienceI find my zenith doth depend uponA most auspicious star, whose influenceIf now I court not, but omit, my fortunesWill ever after droop Here cease questions Thou art inclined to sleep Tis a good dullness,And give it way I know thou canst not choose MirandaCome away, servant, come I am ready now sleepsApproach, my Ariel, come Enter ArielARIEL All hail, great master Grave sir, hail I comeTo answer thy best pleasure be t to fly,To swim, to dive into the fire, to rideOn the curled clouds to thy strong bidding taskAriel and all his quality.PROSPERO Hast thou, spirit,Performed to point the tempest that I bade thee ARIEL To every article.I boarded the king s ship now on the beak,Now in the waist, the deck, in every cabin,I flamed amazement sometime I d divideAnd burn in many places on the topmast,The yards and bowsprit would I flame distinctly,Then meet and join Jove s lightning, the precursorsO th dreadful thunderclaps, momentaryAnd sight outrunning were not the fire and cracksOf sulphurous roaring, the most mighty NeptuneSeem to besiege and make his bold waves tremble,Yea, his dread trident shake.PROSPERO My brave spirit Who was so firm, so constant, that this coilWould not infect his reason ARIEL Not a soulBut felt a fever of the mad and playedSome tricks of desperation All but marinersPlunged in the foaming brine and quit the vessel,Then all afire with me the king s son, Ferdinand,With hair up staring then like reeds, not hair Was the first man that leaped cried Hell is emptyAnd all the devils are here PROSPERO Why, that s my spirit But was not this nigh shore ARIEL Close by, my master.PROSPERO But are they, Ariel, safe ARIEL Not a hair perished On their sustaining garments not a blemish,But fresher than before and, as thou bad st me,In troops I have dispersed them bout the isle.The king s son have I landed by himself,Whom I left cooling of the air with sighsIn an odd angle of the isle, and sitting,His arms in this sad knot Folds his arms The Signet Classics edition of William Shakespeare s fantastical play that combines elements of tragedy and comedy.Prospero, sorcerer and rightful Duke of Milan, along with his daughter Miranda, has lived on an island for many years since his position was usurped by his brother Antonio Then, as Antonio s ship passes near the island one day, Prospero conjures up a terrible stormThis revised Signet Classics edition includes unique features such as An overview of Shakespeare s life, world, and theaterA special introduction to the play by the editor, Robert Langbaum Selections from William Strachey, Sylvester Jourdain, Montaigne, and Ovid, sources from which Shakespeare derived The Tempest Dramatic criticism from Samuel Taylor Coleridge, E.M.W Tillyard, Lori Jerrell, and others A comprehensive stage and screen history of notable actors, directors, and productions Text, notes, and commentaries printed in the clearest, most readable text And The Tempest Wikipedia The is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in , and thought many critics be the last that Shakespeare wrote aloneIt set on remote island, where sorcerer Prospero, rightful Duke of Milan, plots restore his daughter Miranda her place using illusion skillful manipulation Entire Play ACT I SCENE On ship at sea tempestuous noise thunder lightning heard Enter Master Boatswain Here, master what cheer SparkNotes Tempest s story an exiled ruler who uses magic power argues powerful must show mercy First performed explores consequences European settlement New World Read character analysis plot summary important quotes Plot Overview A storm strikes carrying Alonso, Ferdinand, Sebastian, Antonio, Gonzalo, Stephano, Trinculo, are their way Italy after coming from wedding Alonso daughter, Claribel, prince Tunis Africa royal party other mariners, with exception Folger Library shipwreck magic, begins caught violent king Naples, board nearby tells Miranda, he has caused magical powers IMDb In Julie Taymor version Tempest, main now woman named Prospera Going back th or century, women practicing arts Summary Shmoop Free events won t make you snore We promise Helen Mirren, Russell Brand film would win Bard approval It beautiful modern interpretation Elizabethan pastoral fantasy American based same name ShakespeareIn this version, gender character, changed male female role was played MirrenThe directed premiered Venice Film Festival September Although received generally unfavorable reviews William bapt April English poet, playwright actor, widely regarded as greatest writer language world dramatist Facts, Life, Plays Britannica also spelled Shakspere, byname Avon Swan Avon, baptized Stratford upon Warwickshire, England died dramatist, often called national poet considered all time Plays, Quotes, Biography Poems playwright, actor known works throughout Writer M Movie birthdate assumed baptism His father John son farmer became successful tradesman mother Mary Arden gentry Poet Academy Poets read poems born Arden, probably educated King Edward VI Grammar School Stratford, learned Latin little Greek Roman dramatists Complete Works Shakespeare Welcome Web first edition This site offered plays poetry Internet community since Author Romeo Juliet baptised pre eminent Family Life Section provides information regarding ancestry, parents childhood, education, family, parents, brothers sisters, marriage wife Anne Hathaway, children Grandchildren, Sir Davenant possible illegitimate Quotes BrainyQuote Enjoy best BrainyQuote Quotations Dramatist, Born Share your friends Poem Hunter Poetry Browse through Still Rise, Road Not Taken, If You Forget Me, Dreams, Annabel Lee The Tempest

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